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National Indigenous History Month - Online Display

Introduction

 

        The National Indigenous Peoples Day banner, free from the Government of Canada website

June is National Indigenous History Month in Canada. 

Canadians celebrate National Indigenous History Month to honour the history, heritage and diversity of Indigenous peoples in Canada. It is also an opportunity to recognize the strength of present-day Indigenous communities.

The history of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples is the history of our country, as they are the first peoples of Canada and continue to play important roles in its development and its future. Learn more about the history of Indigenous peoples in Canada.

1. National Indigenous History Month. Retrieved from: https://www.rcaanc-cirnac.gc.ca/eng/1466616436543/1534874922512

Featured e-Resources

In my own moccasins : a memoir of resilience

Helen Knott, a highly accomplished Indigenous woman, seems to have it all. But in her memoir, she offers a different perspective. In My Own Moccasins is an unflinching account of addiction, intergenerational trauma, and the wounds brought on by sexual violence. It is also the story of sisterhood, the power of ceremony, the love of family, and the possibility of redemption.

A Two-Spirit Journey

A compelling, harrowing, but ultimately uplifting story of resilience and self-discovery."A Two-Spirit Journey" is Ma-Nee Chacaby's extraordinary account of her life as an Ojibwa-Cree lesbian. From her early, often harrowing memories of life and abuse in a remote Ojibwa community riven by poverty and alcoholism, Chacaby's story is one of enduring and ultimately overcoming the social, economic, and health legacies of colonialism. As a child, Chacaby learned spiritual and cultural traditions from her Cree grandmother and trapping, hunting, and bush survival skills from her Ojibwa stepfather. She also suffered physical and sexual abuse by different adults, and in her teen years became alcoholic herself. At twenty, Chacaby moved to Thunder Bay with her children to escape an abusive marriage. Abuse, compounded by racism, continued, but Chacaby found supports to help herself and others. Over the following decades, she achieved sobriety; trained and worked as an alcoholism counsellor; raised her children and fostered many others; learned to live with visual impairment; and came out as a lesbian. In 2013, Chacaby led the first gay pride parade in Thunder Bay.Ma-Nee Chacaby has emerged from hardship grounded in faith, compassion, humour, and resilience. Her memoir provides unprecedented insights into the challenges still faced by many Indigenous people.

The Education of Augie Merasty

The harrowing story of one Indigenous child's experience in Canada's residential schools Named the fourth most important "Book of the Year" by the National Post and voted "One Book/One Province" in Saskatchewan, The Education of Augie Merasty launched on the front page of The Globe and Mail to become a national bestseller. Publishers Weekly called the book "historically significant," and The Toronto Star recommended it as a must read for "any Canadian interested in truth and reconciliation." Writing in The Globe and Mail, educator J.D.M. Stewart noted that it "is well suited to a teenage audience because of its brevity and frankness." This new edition includes a Learning Guide that deepens our understanding of the residential school experience, making it ideal for classroom and book club use. It also features a new postscript by David Carpenter, describing how the publication of his memoir changed Augie Merasty's life.

Braiding Sweetgrass

Called the work of "a mesmerizing storyteller with deep compassion and memorable prose" (Publishers Weekly) and the book that, "anyone interested in natural history, botany, protecting nature, or Native American culture will love," by Library Journal, Braiding Sweetgrass is poised to be a classic of nature writing. As a botanist, Robin Wall Kimmerer asks questions of nature with the tools of science. As a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, she embraces indigenous teachings that consider plants and animals to be our oldest teachers. Kimmerer brings these two lenses of knowledge together to take "us on a journey that is every bit as mythic as it is scientific, as sacred as it is historical, as clever as it is wise” (Elizabeth Gilbert). Drawing on her life as an indigenous scientist, a mother, and a woman, Kimmerer shows how other living beings offer us gifts and lessons, even if we’ve forgotten how to hear their voices.