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HISTORY 2HI3 - Historical Inquiry: Immigrants Experiences in Canada & US, 1880-1960

How to Evaluate Resources

Not sure if a source is valid? This video explains how you can tell -- by using the CRAAP test. (2:10)

Transcript (PDF) | Transcript (.docx)

Evaluating Primary Sources

When evaluating primary sources consider:                                                             When evaluating online primary sources consider:

1. Reliability- Is it trustworthy?                                                                                  1. Authority- Who is responsible for the website?

2. Origin- Where did it come from?                                                                           2. Audience- Who is the intended audience?

3. Validity- Does it add to your research?                                                                 3. Accuracy: Where did the documents come from?

4. Accuracy-Are there any errors?                                                                            4. Content- Is it explained, organized and accessible? 

The National Library of Jamaica (2010). Evaluating Primary and Secondary Sources: An Online TutorialAvailable from: https://www.nlj.gov.jm/rai/CSEC/Evaluating%20Primary​%20and%20Secondary%20Sources.pdf

Evaluating Secondary Sources

When evaluating secondary sources consider:

1. Suitability- Is there relevant information?

2. Objectivity- Can you detect the bias?

3. Accuracy and Credibility- Corroborate with other sources and check references.

4. Currency- What is the date of publication?

5. Authority- Who is the author and publisher?

The National Library of Jamaica (2010). Evaluating Primary and Secondary Sources: An Online TutorialAvailable from: https://www.nlj.gov.jm/rai/CSEC/Evaluating%20Primary​%20and%20Secondary%20Sources.pdf

Scholarly Versus Popular

Scholarly versus Popular Articles What are the differences?  Authors: Scholarly authors may be researchers and scholars such as university professors. Popular source authors include staff writers such as journalists and freelance writers.  Audience: Scholarly audience could include professors, students, and other researchers. Popular source audiences are the general public.  Purpose: Scholarly articles are written to present and share original research or experiments. The purpose of popular sources is to inform, entertain or persuade the general public.  Language: Scholarly articles use formal, technical and specialized language. Popular sources use every day language.  References: Scholarly sources use footnotes, endnotes, bibliographies and suggested reading. Popular sources typically use few to no citations.

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