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Black History Month - Online Display

Introduction

 

                                 

The precursor to Black History Month, "Negro History Week", was created in 1926 in the United States by Carter G. Woodson, historian, and the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History. At the time of Negro History Week’s launch, Woodson asserted that teaching black history was necessary to ensure the physical and intellectual survival of the race within wider society:  

If a race has no history, it has no worthwhile tradition, it becomes a negligible factor in the thought of the world,

and it stands in danger of being exterminated …”

In December 1995, the Canadian House of Commons officially recognized February as Black History Month, following a motion introduced by the first Black Canadian woman elected to Parliament, the Hon. Jean Augustine. The motion was carried unanimously.

In February 2008, Senator Donald Oliver, the first Black man appointed to the Senate, introduced the 'Motion to Recognize Contributions of Black Canadians and February as Black History Month'. The approval and adoption of this motion completed Canada’s parliamentary position on Black History Month.

Black History Month is an opportunity for all Canadians to learn about the many contributions Black Canadians have made to Canada.

1. Retrieved from BC Black History Awareness Society: https://bcblackhistory.ca/learning-centre/black-history-month/ 
2. Retrieved from Government of Canada - Canadian Heritage: https://www.canada.ca/en/canadian-heritage/campaigns/black-history-month.html

Featured e-Resources

The Blacks in Canada

Using an impressive array of primary and secondary materials, Robin Winks details the diverse experiences of Black immigrants to Canada, including Black slaves brought to Nova Scotia and the Canadas by Loyalists at the end of the American Revolution, Black refugees who fled to Nova Scotia following the War of 1812, Jamaican Maroons, and fugitive slaves who fled to British North America. He also looks at Black West Coast businessmen who helped found British Columbia, and Black settlement in the prairie provinces. Throughout Winks explores efforts by African-Canadians to establish and maintain meaningful lifestyles in Canada. The Blacks in Canada investigates the French and English periods of slavery, the abolitionist movement in Canada, and the role played by Canadians in the broader continental antislavery crusade, as well as Canadian adaptations to nineteenth- and twentieth-century racial mores.

Until We Are Free

The killing of Trayvon Martin in 2012 by a white assailant inspired the Black Lives Matter movement, which quickly spread outside the borders of the United States. The movement's message found fertile ground in Canada, where Black activists speak of generations of injustice and continue the work of the Black liberators who have come before them. Until We Are Free contains some of the very best writing on the hottest issues facing the Black community in Canada. It describes the latest developments in Canadian Black activism, organising efforts through the use of social media, Black-Indigenous alliances, and more.

Welcome to the Universe

The New York Times bestselling tour of the cosmos from three of today's leading astrophysicists    Welcome to the Universe is a personal guided tour of the cosmos by three of today's leading astrophysicists. Inspired by the enormously popular introductory astronomy course that Neil deGrasse Tyson, Michael A. Strauss, and J. Richard Gott taught together at Princeton, this book covers it all--from planets, stars, and galaxies to black holes, wormholes, and time travel.    Describing the latest discoveries in astrophysics, the informative and entertaining narrative propels you from our home solar system to the outermost frontiers of space. How do stars live and die? Why did Pluto lose its planetary status? What are the prospects of intelligent life elsewhere in the universe? How did the universe begin? Why is it expanding and why is its expansion accelerating? Is our universe alone or part of an infinite multiverse? Answering these and many other questions, the authors open your eyes to the wonders of the cosmos, sharing their knowledge of how the universe works.    Breathtaking in scope and stunningly illustrated throughout, Welcome to the Universe is for those who hunger for insights into our evolving universe that only world-class astrophysicists can provide.

Building the Black Metropolis

From Jean Baptiste Point DuSable to Oprah Winfrey, black entrepreneurship has helped define Chicago. Robert E. Weems Jr. and Jason P. Chambers curate a collection of essays that place the city as the center of the black business world in the United States. Ranging from titans like Anthony Overton and Jesse Binga to McDonald's operators to black organized crime, the scholars shed light on the long overlooked history of African American work and entrepreneurship since the Great Migration. Together they examine how factors like the influx of southern migrants and the city's unique segregation patterns made Chicago a prolific incubator of productive business development "and made building a black metropolis as much a necessity as an opportunity. Contributors: Jason P. Chambers, Marcia Chatelain, Will Cooley, Robert Howard, Christopher Robert Reed, Myiti Sengstacke Rice, Clovis E. Semmes, Juliet E. K. Walker, and Robert E. Weems Jr.

Michelle Obama in Her Own Words

The election of Barack Obama brought worldwide attention not only to what his policies would be, but to what kind of First Lady Michelle Obama would be. Throughout the long campaign season, Michelle Robinson Obama garnered a good amount of attention, kudos and criticism about her words, actions, even her appearance, but few people knew what kind of role she would play once she settles into the White House. One clue is to examine her words and statements of the past, and the book Michelle Obama In Her Own Words will show readers who are eager to learn more about America's new history-making First Lady.

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